Foucault’s Clay Feet: Ancient Greek Vases in Contemporary Theories of Intercourse

Foucault’s Clay Feet: Ancient Greek Vases in Contemporary Theories of Intercourse

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Although Michel Foucault never mentions the items clearly, their work on ancient greek language sexuality depends in critical aspects on proof from sex scenes on ancient Greek pottery. The importance associated with pictures comes towards the fore in their argument in regards to the radical distinction associated with the gender-blind ethics of desire in Greek antiquity through the gender-based norms of modernity. Into the overarching narrative of their multi-volume genealogy of contemporary sex, the alterity of Greece underlines his wider contention concerning the discursive foundation of sexual experience. This article confronts the historiographical biases that led Foucault to overlook the product nature of their sources and explores the implications this silence spelled for their successors. Its argument evolves all over instruments that are disciplinary scholars use to include three-dimensional items inside the bounds of verbal description.